Can Coir Door Mats Get Wet Or Stain?

Can Coir Door Mats Get Wet Or Stain?

Coco doormats are quite resistant to the elements while being made of a natural coconut fiber that is high absorbent and lasts for an extended period.

What would happen however, if that fiber gest wet and what types of fluids may leave a permanent stain on the mat? We’ll break down our recommendations on what to do if any unwanted spills happen to occur and some mitigation tips or ways to save your favorite mat. 

Spray Paint Coir Mat 

Our mats are printed with using an industrial printing machine with UV lighting and highly durable ink. While that is already a large improvement over a spray can doormat you could make at home it is not immune to certain acidic fluids. 

Water stain on coir mat: 

Can coir door mats get wet? While the mat does absorb water from your shoes very well its purpose is as an aesthetic piece first with the additional benefits of scraping your shoes clean. We recommend keeping it under a covered area or porch where it would not be exposed to direct rainfall or harsh UV rays from the sun for an extended period of time. These are all in keeping your doormat looking its best and lasting for years to come. 

Every now and then having a bit of water hit it should not cause an issue but due to its absorbent material, excess water cause it to become water logged and can leave a the mat a darker shade when absorbing the water. 

Pee Stains

While we all know that our doormat will definitely not double as a washroom, our pets are living in their own world. 

Do you have a pet dog or cat in your house? If so, then you surely know about the small ‘accidents’ that your pet occasionally causes in the home. We have all experienced a pet dog or cat peeing on your favorite mat. Because the mat fibers will absorb liquids, it is important to remove the urine as soon as possible. Untreated, pet urine will stain your mats and it leads to a strong, pungent smell. If you can’t fully remove the urine yourself, and if the odor and staining on the mat are extensive, you may need to investigate a replacement mat altogether. 

Removing Dog or Cat Urine Stains 

It is important to remove the urine as quickly as possible to preserve your mat. Hopefully, you have found the urine while it is still wet. When the urine dries, the uric acid will leave a stain. Also, the further the urine seeps into the layers of the mat, the harder it will be to remove it. Additionally, bacterial growth is more likely when urine dries in the mat. 

To remove the urine while it is still wet, blot with paper towels to remove as much liquid as possible. You can also use old newspapers to absorb the urine. Press the papers into the mat for better absorption. 

Save your favorite mat 

Neutralizing Pet Urine Odor 

Pet urine can result in challenges beyond stains. It can also leave an undesired odor for quite some time. Removing the urine quickly will reduce the chance of a lingering smell. Here are some tips to help control and neutralize pet urine odors: 

Soak Up the Urine As Soon As Possible–The first step towards neutralizing pet urine odor is soaking up the urine from the mat while it is still wet. As described above, blot or dab the puddle of urine using paper towels or similar absorbent items. Refrain from rubbing, which can spread urine to other parts of the mat. Exert direct pressure on the paper towels to blot the mat as dry as possible. Dispose of the paper towels immediately to do away with the smell.

Vinegar Cleaning Solution–Add one part white vinegar to one part water. Urine smells like ammonia, and this is neutralized with white vinegar. After blotting the area dry, pour the vinegar solution on the affected area, and let the solution soak for 10 minutes to reach the deepest fibers in the mat. Use paper towels to blot and dry the vinegar solution. It may be necessary to elevate the mat to aid drying and prevent moisture damage. Keep in mind to only try on the contaminated area to avoid further staining. 

Baking Soda–Once dry, sprinkle a very little amount of baking soda on the affected area to absorb the pungent odor. The remaining odor will dissipate after vacuuming the mat. 

Unfortunately, once the stain has dried it is much harder to remove from the mat and if they smell is not going away the next best resolution would be to discard it entirely. A fresh clean mat or your doorstep may just be what you need to gently say goodbye to your long-lost old friend.